Called the “Infinity Burial suit” this one-piece burial suit is made of  mushroom spore-infused thread, which will grow from your body once you’re buried, digesting you in the process. The concept here is that mushrooms are natural decomposers and the application on this burial suit pod was tested by Jae Rhim Lee who personally fed mushroom bits off her skin, hair and nails to find the best decomposer. Priced at $1000 the creators these suits are already receiving applications from buyers and also working on smaller burial suit pods for pets. Lee believes that, “The mushroom burial suit will help create a cultural shift toward a cultural acceptance of death and our personal responsibility for environmental sustainability.” Read all the details on ALPHR

Tafilalt – Algeria’s first desert city is being touted as an “eco-city” with the enthusiastic work of its residents getting together to recycle waste and planting trees. A grass-roots initiative, it aims to preserve the Mozabite community  – Amazigh-speaking Berber people who originally live in the M’Zab Valley and maintain their connectedness to the natural world. In a weekly rotation system, families take turns to clean off the debris and waste in the neighbourhood. In return for recycling the wastes, residents get free community produce like fresh milk & eggs for their families. Three concrete reservoirs and pipes have been set up in a corner of the eco-park and a “phyto-purification technique” is being used to water medicinal plants with recycled water.  This eco-park grows a variety of date palms, fruit trees and shrubs without the use of chemical fertilisers or pesticides. The garden has a wide range of medicinal plants like lavender, verbena and rosemary. Additionally, all existing inhabitants and those seeking occupancy have to plant and grow one palm tree and two different fruit trees. Read rest of the details on Middle East Eye.

Researchers at the St. Petersburg ITMO University have used nano-technology to come up with an eco-friendly invisible green ink that is suitable for colour printing.“Controlled multi-layered printing allowed us to create optical nano structures of desired thickness. Colors appear because of these nano structures. Today we can create at least a few dozen color tones,” said Aleksandr Vinogradov, head of the research. Read complete details on RT Question More.

 

 

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