Beijing which celebrates Qingming Festival or Tomb Sweeping Day, has issued new regulations to encourage eco-friendly burials. Use of non-decomposable construction materials, such as cement and stone, is being reduced in building tombs while degradable urns are encouraged in funerals, the regulations said. According to Chinese traditions,  the dead should be buried, but the custom has put a strain on the populous country’s land resources and pushed up the price of cemetery plots.To deal with the problem, Beijing started promoting eco-friendly burials in the 1990s, encouraging land-saving funerals such as sea burials and tree funerals. According to Beijing Civil Affairs Bureau, the city aims to ensure half of all funerals are conducted in an eco-friendly way by 2020. Read the complete details on China Daily USA

The Gangkouwan Hydropower Station along a tributary of China’s Yangtze River,  does more than generate electricity. The facility’s reservoir protects 36,600 hectares of farmland, towns, villages and roads from major floods. Water flow is managed to ensure crops are irrigated and in line with the reproduction cycle of fish downstream.The power station blends in well with lush plantations nearby, clean running water underneath and the picturesque mountain ridges on both sides. Hydropower generating facilities along the Yangtze River are undergoing majors overhauls to make them as eco-friendly as Gangkouwan. Read the complete details on Xinhua Net

In April, with Earth Day on the 22nd and Sik-mok-il (Korea’s version of Earth Day, celebrated by planting trees) on the 5th, it’s a good time to be (more) environmentally friendly. To inspire you, here are four spots in Seoul paving the path for a greener city. Check this Time Out feature for complete details.

 

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